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October 2014
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Coming Up at the Weitz Center

Upcoming public events at
Carleton’s Weitz Center

(Note: times and venues are subject to change.  Carleton recommends verifying before you attend:
http://apps.carleton.edu/calendar/ .)

Film (Weitz Cinema)

Sun., Oct. 19    2:00   Student Union Movie Organization: “Guardians of the Galaxy” (2014)

“A group of space criminals must work together to stop the fanatical villain Ronan the Accuser from destroying the galaxy.”  (imdb.com)

8:00   “Guardians of the Galaxy”

11:00   “Guardians of the Galaxy”

Mon., Oct. 20   7:00    International Film forum: “In the Fog” (Russia, 2012)

“Western frontiers of the USSR, 1942. The region is under German occupation. A man is wrongly accused of collaboration. Desperate to save his dignity, he faces impossible moral choice.”  (imdb.com)

Wed., Oct. 22   7:00    “Do the Right Thing”

Screening of Spike Lee’s classic and eerily relevant 1989 film.

Fri., Oct. 24      8:00    Student Union Movie Organization: “Obvious Child” (2014)

“A twenty-something comedienne’s unplanned pregnancy forces her to confront the realities of independent womanhood for the first time.”  (imdb.com)

11:00   “Obvious Child”

Sat., Oct. 25     2:00   “Obvious Child”

5:00   Film Society: “Dodes’ka-den” (Kurosawa, 1970)

“Various tales in the lives of Tokyo slum dwellers, including a mentally deficient young man obsessed with driving his own commuter trolley.”  (imdb.com)

8:00   “Obvious Child”

11:00   “Obvious Child”

Reading (Weitz 236)

Tue., Oct. 21    7:30    Reading by poet Brian Turner

Brian Turner is a poet and essayist who writes about his experience as a soldier in the Iraq War.  Related to the exhibit Always Lost.

Drama (Weitz Theater)

Thu., Oct. 23    7:30    “After Miss Julie”

Experimental Theater Board production.  “A play by Patrick Marber which relocates August Strindberg’s naturalist tragedy, Miss Julie (1888), to an English country house in July 1945.”  (wikipedia)

Fri., Oct. 24      7:30    “After Miss Julie”

Sat., Oct. 25     7:30    “After Miss Julie”

Museum exhibitions (through November 19)

Then and Now: the Changing Arctic Landscape

Pairing decades-old, large-format photos of Alaska’s Arctic with contemporary views from the same vantage points, sets changes in the northern landscape into stark relief.

Christina Seely: Markers of Time

Works culled from expeditionary travels to the arctic and the tropics examine understandings of time and place.

National touring arts & humanities exhibition (to Oct. 24)

Always Lost: A Meditation on War

The exhibition’s heart is the Wall of the Dead: individual photographs with names of the more than 6,500 U.S. military war casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan since Sept. 11, 2001.

A Partial Solar Eclipse

We’re so glad that our weather was fine and that the Carleton Goodhue Observatory had a good turnout to observe our partial solar eclipse on Thursday,  Oct. 23.    Using indirect observing tools to prevent frying our retinas,  these shots were obtained.    EdDSC_2936 DSC_2939 DSC_2944 DSC_2948

Annual Picnic

A good time was had by all

at the annual NESNA picnic,  again held at the Weitz Center.   And again Carleton made a hit with the neighborhood by offering us the assembly room at the Weitz,  PLUS beverages and desserts.    These photos show Grace Clark handling the reception desk,  a view of the nice turnout,  a glimpse of Suzie Nakasian offering people something to think about,   and President Jerri addressing the crowd.   What a nice way to conclude another academic year!      Ed

 

 

Owlet Leaves the Nest!

Dick Crouter made this fine photo with his cell phone!    They seem to   be growing fast.     Thanks,  Dick——Ed

Additions to the Neighborhood Owl Family

We are grateful to Paula Lackie for this photograph.    We believe two owlets have been growing up in the tree at the corner of Oak and 1st Sts.,  and that the barred mother owl can be dimly seen behind them.    I know we’ll all respect their privacy.    Ed